Monthly Archives: April 2017

Is Bad Breath Making you Miserable? read more

Bad breath or halitosis is a common problem that can affect anyone at any age. About one in four people are thought to have bad breath. A new study published in the International Journal of Dental Hygiene looked at the impact of bad breath in relation to people’s quality of life and on average found that people who suffer from bad breath were found to be less confident as those who didn’t. Individuals who suffer from bad breath say that it can have a negative impact on them psychologically in areas such as communication and self -esteem.
Getting rid of bad breath is relatively easy to achieve. It is a common problem and there are many different causes, it’s not always down to what you have just eaten! A simple test to find out if you have bad breath is to lick the inside of your wrist with the back of your tongue and wait a few seconds until the saliva dries. If the wrist smells unpleasant the its likely the breath will too.

Causes of Bad Breath

  • Smelly gases released by bacteria that coat the teeth, gums and tongue.
  • Food trapped between teeth can rot and cause an unpleasant smell.
  • Gum disease and tooth decay are caused by the same bacteria that causes halitosis. Having bad breath all the time or a bad taste in your mouth are warning signs of gum disease.
  • Poor oral hygiene.
  • Smoking and chewing tobacco.
  • Dry mouth (also called xerostoma) can also cause bad breath. Saliva is necessary to moisten the mouth, neutralize acids produced by plaque and wash away dead cells that accumulate on the tongue, gums and cheeks. If not removed they decompose and cause bad breath. Dry mouth can also be a side effect of various medications, salivary gland problems or continuous breathing through the mouth.

Preventing Bad Breath

  • Good oral hygiene. Brushing twice a day with fluoride toothpaste and don’t forget to brush the tongue as well! Replace toothbrush every 2 to 3 months and use floss or interdental cleaners to remove food particles once a day. Dentures should be removed at night and cleaned thoroughly.
  • Mouth wash or sugar free chewing gum which can stimulate saliva which washes away food particles and bacteria.
  • See a dentist and hygienist regularly.

Who Treats Bad Breath?

In most cases your dentist can treat bad breath. If the bad breath is not of oral origin, you may be referred to your doctor. If the odour is due to gum disease then you could be referred to a periodontist who treats gum conditions.
Please feel free to call the Mayhill Dental Centre on 01600 712020 or email info@themayhill.co.uk for further information or advice.

Periodontist Joins the Mayhill Dental & Specialist Centre read more

We are delighted to announce that Dr. Jim Dufty will be joining us as an associate in March 2017. Jim has a special interest in periodontics and has had many years of experience treating these conditions successfully. Jim has a realistic approach and will do whatever he can to save the natural dentition. This would include hard and soft tissue grafting where appropriate.

He will take referrals for perio and restorative patients and will provide a full range of both non-surgical and surgical treatments. He has published internationally and continues to be involved with dental postgraduate education, working with King’s College London’s Prosthodontic and Aesthetic Dentistry distance learning programs in both teaching and advisory roles.

What is a Periodontist?

A periodontist is a dentist who specialises (or who has a special interest) in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of periodontal disease (gum disease). They are experts in the treatment of inflammation in the tissues and bone surrounding the teeth.

What are the causes of Periodontitis?

The causes of periodontal disease are primarily focused on the body’s response to bacterial insult, but also include family history, poor oral hygiene, bacterial dental plaque, diabetes and smoking. There is growing evidence researching the link between periodontitis and diabetes, heart disease and other systemic disease. It is therefore important to treat periodontitis not just for oral health but potentially for general health too.

Periodontal disease can lead to the loss of attachment of the supporting tissues of the tooth, e.g. the gum, connecting tissues and bone that support the teeth. Common periodontal conditions are gingivitis and periodontitis which are both caused by plaque or what is known as bacterial biofilm. Dental plaque is the sticky film that forms on the teeth and contains bacteria.

What are the symptoms of gum disease?

Severe periodontitis affects 10-15 percent of the population and is inflammation which extends to form a pocket between the tooth and infected gums. It may be symptomless but symptoms include swollen red or bleeding gums, over sensitive teeth or bad breath. Advanced signs may include abscesses, loose teeth and eventually tooth loss. It can also lead to receding gums which exposes more of the root, which can heighten sensitivity. 

When should you see a periodontist?

If your dentist has diagnosed periodontal disease or there is a problem with your gums then a referral to a periodontist would be advisable. If left untreated it can destroy the bone and tissue that surround the teeth. Your dentist may also refer you to try to replace lost gum tissue and for crown lengthening to improve appearance. 

If you would like any further advice please call the Mayhill Dental Centre on 01600 712020 or email info@themayhill.co.uk